The American desert state of Nevada is home to around 3 million people. Because of its historically high silver deposits, it is nicknamed Silver State.

Silver State – Nevada is nicknamed because of the historical importance of silver for the economy of the western US state. Today about 3 million people live in the territory of Nevada, which extends over 286,000 km². Nevada is the seventh largest US state, at the same time the desert state is one of the North American regions with the lowest population density. Geographically, Nevada lies largely in the Great Basin with vast desert landscapes, while a small part of the north belongs to the mountainous Sierra Nevada. The state’s capital is Carson City, home to approximately 55,000 residents.

Nevada – historical background to the Silver State

The region around Nevada was settled by the indigenous people of North America over 20,000 years ago. Today’s desert state is considered the historic home of tribes like the Pueblo, Mojave, Paiute, Washoe, and Shohons. European settlement of what is now the US state began in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. At that time, the Old Spanish Trail trade route ran through southern Nevada. Around 1858 the discovery of silver deposits in the region caused increased interest and so-called “boom towns” were established. In 1864, Nevada became a US state. The history of gambling within Nevada stretched back to the days of the silver boom, but by 1931 the local governor enacted the most liberal gambling laws in the United States,

Nevada cities and landmarks

By far the largest city in Nevada is the entertainment capital Las Vegas with a population of over 580,000 and a metropolitan area of over 2.2 million. Henderson (257,000 residents) and Reno (225,000) follow Las Vegas. Most of Nevada’s attractions are in Las Vegas, with its numerous casinos, clubs and cultural institutions. With Lake Mead and its Hoover Dam and the Great Basin National Park, Nevada also has nationally known natural attractions.

The American desert state of Nevada is home to around 3 million people. Because of its historically high silver deposits, it is nicknamed Silver State.

Silver State – Nevada is nicknamed because of the historical importance of silver for the economy of the western US state. Today about 3 million people live in the territory of Nevada, which extends over 286,000 km². Nevada is the seventh largest US state, at the same time the desert state is one of the North American regions with the lowest population density. Geographically, Nevada lies largely in the Great Basin with vast desert landscapes, while a small part of the north belongs to the mountainous Sierra Nevada. The state’s capital is Carson City, home to approximately 55,000 residents.

Nevada – historical background to the Silver State

The region around Nevada was settled by the indigenous people of North America over 20,000 years ago. Today’s desert state is considered the historic home of tribes like the Pueblo, Mojave, Paiute, Washoe, and Shohons. European settlement of what is now the US state began in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. At that time, the Old Spanish Trail trade route ran through southern Nevada. Around 1858 the discovery of silver deposits in the region caused increased interest and so-called “boom towns” were established. In 1864, Nevada became a US state. The history of gambling within Nevada stretched back to the days of the silver boom, but by 1931 the local governor enacted the most liberal gambling laws in the United States,

Nevada cities and landmarks

By far the largest city in Nevada is the entertainment capital Las Vegas with a population of over 580,000 and a metropolitan area of over 2.2 million. Henderson (257,000 residents) and Reno (225,000) follow Las Vegas. Most of Nevada’s attractions are in Las Vegas, with its numerous casinos, clubs and cultural institutions. With Lake Mead and its Hoover Dam and the Great Basin National Park, Nevada also has nationally known natural attractions.

Nevada State Bird and Flower

Largest Counties in Nevada by Area

According to Countryaah, the biggest counties in Nevada are listed as below:

Ranking County Area
1 Carson City 373 km² km2
2 Nye County 47,001 km2
3 Elko County 44,501 km2
4 Lincoln County 27,545 km2
5 Humboldt County 25,014 km2
6 White Pine County 22,991 km2
7 Clark County 20,489 km2
8 Washoe County 16,426 km2
9 Pershing County 15,563 km2
10 Lander County 14,229 km2
11 Churchill County 12,766 km2
12 Eureka County 10,816 km2
13 Mineral County 9,731 km2
14 Esmeralda County 9,295 km2
15 Lyon County 5,164 km2
16 Douglas County 1,839 km2
17 Storey County 684 km2